Managing Endometriosis

Managing Endometriosis

Endometriosis - can good nutrition help?

As part of Endometriosis Awareness Month I’ve been sharing nutrition tips (see below) and a Facebook Live that focus on simple steps to support hormone balance.

Endometriosis affects over 1.5 million women and girls in the UK alone, and many women suffer for years before receiving a clear diagnosis.

The condition is caused by cells that normally live in the womb growing in other parts of the body.  They can grow on the bowel, the ovaries, even in lungs, eyes and the brain.

Because these cells are womb cells, they respond to the hormonal changes of a woman’s menstrual cycle, growing larger during the second half of the cycle and even bleeding during menstruation.

These changes can cause a wide range of symptoms including painful heavy periods, pain during sex, bowel problems, depression, exhaustion, and infertility.

In the video I explore these tips in more depth and answer some common questions about periods and endometriosis.

If you’d like to know more feel free to comment below or hop over to the Facebook Group at www.facebook.com/groups/nutritioninyork and join in the conversations there!

Veganuary – the nutrition tips you need to avoid bloating & fatigue

Veganuary – the nutrition tips you need to avoid bloating & fatigue

January 2019 is set to be the most popular Veganuary yet, with over 14,000 people pledging to stick to a vegan diet and lifestyle for the next month.

Whatever your reasons are for cutting out meat, fish, dairy, eggs, honey, and all other animal derived products, the sudden swap to a vegan diet can have a significant impact on your body, especially if you’re used to eating animal produce every day.  Digestion and energy levels are frequently affected: let’s explore why…

Digestion: a sudden increase in fibre and indigestible starch from vegan staples like pulses, beans, nuts and seeds can cause bloating and wind.  Our gut bacteria are influenced by what we eat, and it can take time for them to adapt to a different way of eating.  They thrive on fibre, fermenting it in our gut, which is why one of the side effects of a vegan diet can be uncomfortable wind and bloating!Lady's hands on her tummy, digestion

Bowel movements may also change: some people experience constipation whilst others find stools become loose and more frequent.  Again, this is down to the change in fibre intake.

  • If you’re suffering with wind and bloating try using a plant-based digestive enzyme formula to support the breakdown of tough plant fibres and starches.  Look for one containing alpha-galactosidase, an enzyme proven to reduce gas and bloating.

  • Soaking pulses before cooking and using fermented soya products like miso and tempeh can aid digestion.

  • Sprouting beans in a seed sprouter can make them easier to digest.

  • Soak nuts overnight then allow to dry before eating; this can aid digestability.

  • Be mindful of your fluid intake, especially if constipated.  Fibre soaks up fluid in the gut, so remember to drink more water throughout the day, and opt for hydrating foods like soups and stews that combine fibre-rich beans and pulses with fluids.

Energy levels: switching from being carnivore to vegan means your body has to adapt to different nutrient sources.  This can affect energy levels, particularly if you’re a pre-menopausal woman with regular periods as you are now reliant on plant-based or non-haem iron sources.

The main nutrients to consider are;

Iron: non-haem iron absorption is helped along by vitamin C so aim to combine these nutrients where possible:

Table of iron foods and vitamin C foods

Zinc: red meat, poultry, and seafood are packed with easily absorbed zinc, so your body has to adapt to deriving it from plant foods on a vegan diet.  Nuts and seeds – especially pumpkin seeds – are good sources, but they also contain phytic acid which can impair zinc absorption.  Soaking the nuts and seeds before eating helps to breakdown phytic acid and improve zinc bioavailability.

Vitamin B12: plant forms of B12 are not readily used by us humans.  You may have enough B12 stores in your system to manage Veganuary, but if veganism is a long-term plan, consider using a B12 supplement or B-Complex containing B12.

Protein: protein is present in varying amounts in foods, which is where the term protein quality comes from.  Eggs are an example of high quality or perfect protein as they contain the right ratio of amino acids (the building blocks of protein) to match our human needs.  On a vegan diet it is important to combine different protein sources at each meal so that over the course of the day you get all the amino acids you need.

Vegan protein sources include:

 – Nuts (whole or as nut butters)

 – Seeds

 – Pseudo-grains like quinoa and amaranth

 – Legumes and pulses

Omega-3 fats: the omega-3 oils found in oily fish are DHA (docosahexanoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid).  We can use these straight away with no need for conversion: they help regulate inflammation and support heart health and mental wellbeing.

Plant foods contain ALA (alpha linolenic acid) which is the ‘parent’ of DHA and EPA.  It goes through several conversion pathways in the body to become EPA and DHA and we lose some of it along the way.  Because of these conversion losses, it’s important for vegans to include ALA sources everyday.

The richest concentrated source of ALA is flaxseed oil; this can be drizzled over cooked vegetables, salads, granola, coconut or soya yoghurt, included in smoothies – the ideas are endless!  I know a lady who adds it to her gravy!  It can be added to hot foods but don’t cook with it as high temperatures affect the oil structure.

Other sources of ALA include walnuts, pumpkin seeds, pumpkin seed oil, hemp oil, and chia seeds.

Plant-based diets can be as varied and nutritious as meaty-fishy ones, but they do require thoughtful planning, especially at the outset.  Browse these recipe blogs for meal inspiration and remember to join the Facebook group and follow me on Twitter where I share a #MeatfreeMonday recipe each week.

Minimalist Baker

Pickles & Honey

Happy Healthy Life

 

Depression & Anxiety – What to Eat to Feel Good

Depression & Anxiety – What to Eat to Feel Good

Depression and anxiety can hit any of us at any time and when it does, taking time to prepare food and eat well can be incredibly difficult.

You can feel overwhelmed by life, paralysed by anxiety, and have little interest in cooking and eating.

The irony is that certain foods and nutrients can support mental wellbeing, and good nutrition is an important step on the path to recovery.  The key to making these changes is to keep them practical and manageable,  Take small sustainable steps, one at a time.  Attempting a full diet overhaul can be a step too far and a bit too challenging when you feel this unwell.

Let’s look at some of the important nutrients that support mental wellbeing, and easy ways to incorporate them into your daily routine.

Go with your gut

As always, we need to start with digestion.  If you’re not breaking down your food properly and absorbing the nutrients it doesn’t matter how many fancy foods and supplements you take – none of them will work.

The trillions of bacteria living in our digestive system – also known Lady's hands on her tummy, digestionas our microbiome – are the subject of ongoing research.  Our gut and brain are communicating constantly via nerve pathways and chemical messengers, many of which are produced or influenced by friendly gut flora (probiotics).

Many of the research studies looking at probiotics and mood balance are small scale but the results are promising and it is now known that certain species, including Bifidobacteria which thrive in the colon, can positively affect mood.

Small Steps to Big Changes

 – Nourish your microbiome by including fermented foods 3-4 times a week.  Try sauerkraut, kefir (dairy or coconut water), natural plain yoghurt, or kimchi.  Do not use if you have histamine problems as fermented foods are rich in histamine.

 – Swap raw foods for warm, cooked foods that are easy to digest; for example swap your lunchtime salad box for a vegetable soup or reheated leftovers.

 – If you have ongoing digestive problems seek help!  Food sensitivities, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Coeliac Disease can all contribute to depression and anxiety so do get in touch with me or a BANT Registered nutrition practitioner in your area for support.  Remember to download your copy of ‘Your 3 Easy Steps to All Day Energy’ too; it’s packed with tips for supporting digestion!

Fats are your brain’s best friend

Your brain contains 25% of your body’s cholesterol, and an awful lot of polyunsaturated omega-3 fats.  If you’re still buying ‘fat-free’ and ‘low-fat’ foods you are doing your brain a great disservice – please stop!

Fats provide structure to our brain cells and help them communicate with each other.  Without fats the messages between brain cells are like a bad mobile phone signal, all crackly and broken up and we are at risk of mood fluctuations and depression.

The long-chain omega-3 fats also have anti-inflammatory actions.  Increased inflammation is associated with several mental health disorders, including depression.  Inflammation is known to alter the balance of mood chemicals like serotonin and dopamine, and affect areas of the brain linked to motivation and perception of threat.  Not every person with depression has increased inflammation but it is a key factor for many, making anti-inflammatory foods part of a brain-health food plan.

Small Steps to Big Changes

 – Include oily fish 2-3 times a week.  Think SMASHT – salmon, mackerel, anchovies, sardines, herrings and trout! A fish and omega 3 supplement capsules

 – If you’re not keen on the taste of oily fish, sneak it into a fish pie or mix tinned sardines / mackerel in tomato sauce into a tomato based veggie sauce.

 – Vegetarians & vegans: make sure to include pumpkin seeds and oil, flax oil, walnuts, or a blend like Udo’s Oil every day to top up your levels of Alpha Linolenic Acid (ALA).  This converts to EPA and DHA (the omega-3 fats found in the brain) but a lot of it is lost in the conversion process hence the daily intake.

Proteins – brain building blocks!

Mood chemicals like serotonin and dopamine are made from amino acids, the little building blocks that make up proteins.  A low protein diet means there may not be enough amino acids to support the production of mood chemicals in the brain.

Small Steps to Big Changes

 – Keep a Food & Mood diary for a week and see how often you eat good quality protein rich foods.

 – Aim to include a palm-sized serving of protein with every meal: choose from eggs, good quality meat or fish, lentils, chickpeas, nuts and seeds.

 Vitamin D

The sunshine vitamin is a biggie for mental health.  There are vitamin D receptors throughout our brains, and low levels are thought to play a role in the development of SAD – Seasonal Affective Disorder.

Here in the UK low levels of vitamin D are common thanks to our often cloudy weather.  Before jumping in with a supplement, I recommend getting your levels tested by either your GP, your nutrition practitioner,  or use the simple home test kit available from www.vitamindtest.org.uk 

Once you know your levels, you can decide whether to supplement or not.  Optimum levels (based on cancer research studies) are between 75-100nmol/l.

Magnesium, folate & B6 – mental health teammates

During times of stress we need to eat plenty of foods packed with these nutrients to give our nervous system extra back-up.  Magnesium and B-vitamins (particularly B6 and folate) are essential for mood chemical production and function, as well as supporting our energy levels.

Small Steps to Big Changes

 – Go green.  Dark green vegetables are rich in both folate AND magnesium.  See if you can include 2 generous handfuls of green leafy veg everyday.  Try adding a big handful of baby spinach to a smoothie or omelette.  Serve broccoli or peas with your evening meal.  If you haven’t got the motivation to prepare fresh veg, buy the ready chopped frozen stuff – at this moment in time it is more important for you to eat the veg than worry about it being fresh.

 – Include two B6 foods everyday: choose from avocado, chicken, Avocadoturkey, lentils, banana, carrots, brown rice, nuts, and seeds.

 – Relax in an Epsom Salt bath!  Epsom salts are rich in magnesium sulphate which can be absorbed through your skin.  Make sure the water is comfortably warm, add a few drops of essential oil if you fancy, and soak for a good 20 mins.  Remember to ban everyone else from the bathroom so you can bathe in peace!

 

I hope you find these tips inspiring, and feel able to try them out one at a time.  Feeding yourself well is one of the kindest things you can do, and you are TOTALLY WORTH the extra ten minutes it takes to prep something tasty!

If you would like more personalised support for managing depression and anxiety do get in touch at sallyduffin@nutritioninyork.co.uk

Hop over to the Facebook group too – it’s a friendly place to share conversations and challenges all about digestive health and mental wellbeing; find us at Nutrition in York

Photo by Jurica Koletić on Unsplash

 

 

 

Lunches On The Go – #1 Small Step

Lunches On The Go – #1 Small Step

Prepared vegetables for lunch

Midweek lunch has to be the most neglected meal.

Squashed in between meetings, deadlines, errands, phonecalls, school runs, it’s too often relegated to Boring Sandwich, ‘Meal Deal’ or Nothing.  Unless you’re in France, in which case take two hours off and dine like you mean it.

Let’s change this.  Let’s spark things up.  Let’s make lunch something you can’t wait to eat, and gets others drooling with envy…

First things first: preparation.  As with all good meals, the magic is in the prep.  Create a list of foods to purchase every week so you always have the necessary bits to hand to make lunches.  If you don’t buy it, you can’t eat it!  Think about vegetables, salad leaves, fruit, tinned fish, fresh meat (see below), and grains like rice, quinoa and buckwheat for salads.

Once you’ve stocked up, take a few minutes to think about the week ahead: how many lunches do you need to prepare?  Where will you be eating?  Does it need to be cold food, or are reheatable items an option?

Use the free  7-Day Meal Planner to capture ideas!

Lady eating lunch

These lunch ingredients can be made in advance and will keep in the fridge for days, giving you plenty of mix-and-match options;

 – Slow cooked meat: at the weekend I like to slow cook a chicken.  I use a slow-cooker so it’s merrily cooking away while I get out and about.  We eat some for Sunday dinner, and the rest is left for pack-ups.  Slow-cooked ham works well too, just shred it with forks and you have pulled-pork filling for pittas or salad.

 – Houmous: there’s a classic houmous recipe from my friend Gina, or try these varieties from Deliciously Ella.

 – Roasted vegetables: chop peppers, aubergine, courgettes, and fennel into chunks and roast in coconut oil for 30-40mins.

 – Hard boiled eggs

 – Pesto: this works well with cashews instead of pine nuts.

 –Homemade soups

 – Brown rice or quinoa: remember to cool rice quickly and store in the fridge until eating.

All prepped?  Now to spend 10mins each morning creating that knockout lunch*….

(*or dinner as it’s known here in Yorkshire.  Breakfast, dinner, and tea.)

Salad Box: rice or quinoa topped with a protein (shredded ham / hardboiled egg / houmous / fish) and a mixture of roasted vegetables and handful of salad leaves.  Dress with a drizzle of olive or flax oil, squeeze of lemon, and black pepper.

Sandwiches: not the boring ones.  Swap dull bread for good quality sourdough or for gluten-free options think creatively and use nori wraps, corn tortillas, or large butterhead lettuce leaves to hold the fillings.

Soups: my all time favourite lunch.  Enjoy with oatcakes and houmous or small chunk of good quality cheese.

Pasta Box: leftover pasta (regular or gluten-free) with pesto, roasted vegetables and cherry tomatoes.

Eating Out

This can be tricky when you have specific dietary needs like gluten or dairy free, but it is getting easier.  I was deliriously happy to discover a ‘Leon’ outlet at the motorway services recently and enjoyed a delicious wheat and dairy-free chicken and brown rice meal!

People eating lunch in a cafe

If you know your options are limited when eating out, carry some basics with you like trail mix and a piece of fruit so you can top up if there’s not much available.

Most city centres have a Pret and an M&S: Pret have a good selection of soups, salad boxes, chopped fruit, and snacky things like nuts and hardboiled eggs with spinach.  Marks & Spencer offer mixed grain salads, picnic sized cheeses, chopped fruit, nuts, and houmous pots.

Stuck at a tiny cafe in the middle of nowhere?  How about a baked potato, omelette, or soup.

Whatever your day holds, a nourishing lunch is essential to sustain your energy and wellbeing.  Symptoms of fatigue, irritability, anxiety, poor concentration and depression are all influenced by the foods we eat, so give your body it’s best shot at working well by feeding it with love and care.

Try these ideas and see what a difference they make to your life – do let me know via email or over in the Facebook group!

You might also like;

Does Food Affect Your Mood? Find out with this FREE Food, Mood and Movement Tracker #1SmallStep

Get Organised with this FREE 7-Day Meal Planner! #1SmallStep

7 Energy Boosting Breakfasts – #1SmallStep

 

PHOTO CREDITS: UNSPLASH

Wake Up Water! Inspiring ideas to help you drink more water everyday – #1 Small Step

Wake Up Water!

It’s so easy to get to the end of the day and realise you haven’t drunk enough water.  Low energy, headaches, muscle aches and cramps – these are all telling signs that your body needs a drink (of water!).

The debate continues about whether tap, filtered, or mineral is best for our health, and there are pros and cons on both sides.

Unless you’re lucky enough to live near a natural spring, good quality mineral water usually comes in plastic bottles which are an environmental nightmare, far outweighing the beneficial mineral content of the drink.

Filtered water has lower levels of chemical residues, but again, filter jugs are mostly plastic so your water bathes in hormone-disrupting chemicals.

There’s no easy solution and I don’t have clear answers!  But, I do know we all need to hydrate regularly over the day, especially when managing low energy or digestive problems like constipation.

Aim to sip regularly rather than gulping down a large glass in one go, and limit drinks at mealtimes to avoid diluting your digestive juices.

It’s a simple and easy first step to take on the road to wellbeing: see if you can increase your water intake and cut down on caffeinated and sugary/sweetened drinks.

If you find plain water a bit dull try these natural alternatives to wake it up!

Use a large glass Mason jar, or glass bottle and leave to infuse for 3-4 hours or overnight for full flavour.  Pop them in the fridge, or if like me you don’t like cold water, leave the bottle at room temperature, out of direct sunlight.

  • Fresh lemon & lemon balm zingy and calming at the same time. Lemon balm is traditionally used to soothe nerves and calm anxiety.

  • Fresh lemon and mint perfect pick-me-up for when you’re tired and flagging, or as an after dinner digestive aid.

  • Fresh squeezed pomegranate juice and mint squeeze the fruit and scoop out the seeds to add to a salad. Mix the juice with water and mint leaves.  Pomegranate is packed with antioxidants to help us process toxins.

  • Cucumber, mint, and lime another cooling, uplifting drink.

  • Raspberries and strawberries chop larger fruits in half, add to water and mix vigorously for a naturally sweet, antioxidant-rich drink.

  • Pineapple & orange sweet and tropical! Even in cloudy Yorkshire!

*Download the Wake Up Water! pdf here – 1SmallStep_WakeUpWater*

Keep taking those #1 Small Steps and you’ll get to where you want to be!

You might also enjoy;

Does Food Affect Your Mood? Find out with this FREE Food, Mood and Movement Tracker #1SmallStep

Get Organised with this FREE 7-Day Meal Planner! #1SmallStep

7 Energy Boosting Breakfasts – #1SmallStep

If you’d like to know more about how nutritional therapy may be able to support you drop me a line at sallyduffin@nutritioninyork.co.uk

You can also join in the conversations in the Facebook group at https://www.facebook.com/groups/nutritioninyork/